Tuesday, August 26, 2008

Pakistan and Sudan- what they have in common

I was reading an article by Paul Sullivan about Pakistan and then it hit me...everything he said screamed Sudan.
The two countries have a lot in common

- Ranked Failed states in 2007 by ForeignPolicy
- Extremism
-Distortion of Islam
-Inequalities
-Constant war-fare ( exported to Afghanistan)
-Badly maintained infrastructure
-Ethnic biases and clashes
-Failure of political parties to unite
-Political Feuds
-Bitterness on all sides ( especially ethnic and religious minorities)
-Culture of Revenge
- A weak state


5 comments:

Anonymous said...

the same could be said for many Muslim countries unfortunately.

Kizzie said...

not really. Tunisia is doing fairly well. Also, some gulf countries are ok.

Anonymous said...

Dear Kizzie,
The following is my response to the article below.
This is my response:

Fact check: The Sudan is not a dictatorship. Living in Egypt would perhaps give you the BEST idea of what constitutes a dictatorship.

I take it that you have never lived in the Sudan, so I admonish you from deluding people into thinking people that you can properly usher them through what's really going on in Sudan. Moreover, I would like to say this in the kindest way possible--but I dare you to try to write an article that may not carry some of the mean stream views in Sudan. Try sending them to the newspapers that are published in the Sudan and let me know if they reject your article. If you haven't been aware, daily newspapers such as Al-Sudani, Al-Watan, Khartoum Monitor, Sudan Tribune, Sudan Nile (Sudanile.com), are some examples. So for goodness sake, for the sake of our country and for the sake of Islam, do not try to make things worse. Good luck in everything that you do and I applaud you for your courage and I can't wait for you to reveal yourself some day.

----
This is the article:
Arab Press Network
18 August 2008

“Journalists in dictatorships like Sudan suffer a great deal”

Kizzie Shawkat is the pen name of the author responsible for the "I Have No Tribe, I'm Sudanese" blog (http://www.wholeheartedly-sudaniya.blogspot.com). She is a Sudanese woman and student of communications and sociology in Cairo. Born in Sudan, Kizzie grew up in Libya, Qatar and the United Arab Emirates and defines herself as an "African pro-choice, creative Muslim pro-female-education, poetic, developing tri-linguist, anti-racism, mad-about-books, theatre-lover female." In an interview with APN, Kizzie explains why she blogs and how she hopes it will make the world a better place.

In a series of articles, APN speaks to prominent bloggers throughout the Arab world.

APN: Why do you blog?

Kizzie Shawkat: I blog because I care about my country, Sudan. As a Sudanese female, I don't have a venue to voice out my opinions about different topics regarding Sudan, especially politics. Just like politicians, I have an opinion and I think my contribution to Sudanese society is important. I also think that international newspapers are a bit biased and that when they report about Sudan they sometimes misinform readers. On my blog I sometimes have news updates; I comment on them and I upload pictures, pictures of a Sudan no one knows about. Citizen journalism needs to be valued more in my part of the world.

APN: Do you think blogging can change the world and the situation in your country? How?

KS: Yes, because as a Sudanese I think I'm responsible for spreading awareness about the political and humanitarian situation in my country. I'm responsible for informing my readers and engaging in mutually beneficial discussions with them. I receive many e-mails from curious readers (Sudanese and non-Sudanese). I also receive e-mails asking me to explain certain things in Sudan they don't understand (politics, culture etc.). I can't change Sudan alone, but I think that my contribution is important. More and more people from every part of the world need to contribute (especially from Africa). I think we need to be more active citizens because we can't expect help from others, only the Sudanese are going to bring peace and democracy to Sudan.

APN: What do you see as the difference between a blogger and a journalist in your country?

KS: In most cases, bloggers don't suffer as much as journalists. I try to stay anonymous because my situation as a student living with my parents is very fragile. I do want to post a picture and introduce myself properly. I'm going to do so when I graduate next year!
Journalists in dictatorships (like Sudan) suffer a great deal. Their work is constantly being censored and their privacy is always invaded. Blogging gives me privacy.

APN: What has been your most popular post?

KS: A post about female genital mutilation (FGM). I wrote this post after I read a post on an Australian blog about Ayan Hirsi Ali. She is a Somali-born Dutch politician who spends her free time reaffirming every single negative stereotype about Islam and this part of the world. I was angry because I felt that I couldn't relate to her story (as a Muslim/African woman) so, I wrote it because I know for a fact that Islam doesn't support FGM and I wanted to clarify the reasons behind it and why it should be abolished. I talked about its prevalence in African countries, its pharaonic legacy, its existence in Christian communities (in Ghana for example) and the different types of FGM.

APN: Do you practice self-censorship?

KS: I don't write about Egypt (where I currently live) because bloggers crackdowns are common place.

APN: What topics inspire you?

KS: I'm usually inspired by gender issues, good news out of Africa and when an average Sudanese makes a difference, for example, by winning a national and international prize, etc.

Anonymous said...

In response to your Arab Press Network interview:
Fact check: The Sudan is not a dictatorship. Living in Egypt would perhaps give you the BEST idea of what constitutes a dictatorship.

I take it that you have never lived in the Sudan, so I admonish you from deluding people into thinking people that you can properly usher them through what's really going on in Sudan. Moreover, I would like to say this in the kindest way possible--but I dare you to try to write an article that may not carry some of the mean stream views in Sudan. Try sending them to the newspapers that are published in the Sudan and let me know if they reject your article. If you haven't been aware, daily newspapers such as Al-Sudani, Al-Watan, Khartoum Monitor, Sudan Tribune, Sudan Nile (Sudanile.com), are some examples. So for goodness sake, for the sake of our country and for the sake of Islam, do not try to make things worse. Good luck in everything that you do and I applaud you for your courage and I can't wait for you to reveal yourself some day.

Ahledo said...

All sub saharian african countries are in the same level.
The difference in Sudan, is that when you go outside your home, you are safe, unlike South Africa, Congo and others.
The infrastructure is rebuilt, take a look at merowe dam:
http://sudaninside.net/merowe-dam/

Anyone going to Khartoum will notice the difference.